Celeb Q&A George JonesThe George Jones Museum will open in downtown Nashville on 2nd Avenue in April 2015, which will be the two-year anniversary of his passing.  The launch of a moonshine named after his first hit song “White Lightning” will be a part of the museum.  The old Graham Central Station building will house the 44,000 square foot event space, along with a 75-foot bar and live performance space.  On Monday January 12, 2015 Jones’ widow Nancy Jones held a press conference to announce this new venture.

“We are overjoyed to share George’s legacy and memory with the Nashville community, and we hope that this will draw George’s friends and fans worldwide to our great city,” related Nancy Jones.

The George Jones Museum will incorporate a gift shop, restaurant, rooftop bar, event space, and music venue.  The story of George Jones’s life will be told, along with artifacts Jones left behind.  The “George Jones White Lighting Moonshine,” which will launch at the same time as the museum, has a partnership with Silver Trail Distillery in Kentucky to make the moonshine. With plans to distribute and sell the product nationally, George acquired this world-famous name shortly before his passing.  Nancy Jones recalled, “George always would say, ‘Alcohol has owned me and controlled much of my life. Now it’s my time to own it!’ So knowing how much George wanted to make this happen, I was determined to carry on George’s passion and vision for this product.”

Nancy also elaborated, “Nashville was home to George and I, and he would be happy to know that we found a home to continue his legacy in the heart of Music City.”

George is buried at Nashville’s Woodlawn Cemetery, where a monument with the words ‘He Stopped Loving Her Today’ stands in his memory. This will be another monument immortalizing one more of his songs, “White Lightning.”

White Lightning MoonshineNancy Jones purchased two pieces of property adjacent to each other at 128 and 130 Second Avenue N. The building is the former home of the Graham Central Station nightclub, and it is in walking distance of the Country Music Hall of Fame, the Nashville Convention Center and the “Mother Church of Country Music,” the Ryman Auditorium.  “The Possum” passed away at the age of 81, and he was known as the country music ambassador to the world, because George bridged gaps for country music no other artist could.  His song “He Stopped Loving Her Today” was labeled “Country Song of the Century” by trade publication Radio & Records. Without a doubt, he left a legacy as powerful as the legend of Jesse James.

It felt as though George Jones was among us at the press conference, and I believe he would be proud this new venture is moving forward.  Nancy was asked the question, “What do you think the first thing George said to Little Jimmy Dickens when he got to heaven?” Nancy replied humorously, “It’s about time you got here! Johnny Cash and Waylon Jennings are wearin’ me out.”

Look for the new George Jones Museum, as it becomes a part of Nashville’s rich history in country music.